AMS logo with two weather instruments AMS
  Boards and
Committees
  Certification
Programs
  Education   Career Center   Exhibits   Meetings   Member Services   News   Policy
Program
  Publications   Students  

spacer

Archived News Releases

Bookmark and Share

 

3/19/2014

NEW STUDY SHOWS TV METEOROLOGISTS CAN TEACH VIEWERS ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE
BOSTON, MA – A new article published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS) showed that television station WLTX in Columbia, South Carolina, improved viewers’ understanding of climate change and its local impact by airing special segments during news broadcasts.
PDF Version

 

12/17/2013

94th AMS Annual Meeting Highlights and Opportunities for Media
Boston, MA – The American Meteorological Society’s (AMS) 94th Annual Meeting is fast approaching with events running from February 2 – 6, 2014, at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia.
PDF Version

 

11/20/2013

Financial Decision Makers Need Weather and Climate Information to Manage Risks
WASHINGTON - Maximizing returns on financial investments depends on accurately understanding and effectively accounting for weather and climate risks, according to a new study by the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Policy Program.
PDF Version

 

10/24/2013

American Meteorological Society and Second Nature Announce 3rd Annual AMS Climate Studies Course Implementation Workshop for MSI Faculty
As part of its Climate Studies Diversity Project, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) is partnering with Second Nature, the supporting organization of the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC), to introduce the AMS Climate Studies course at 100 minority-serving institutions (MSIs) over a five-year period.
PDF Version

 

7/1/2013

Updates to the CBM Application Procedures Effective 1 July 2013
The AMS Board on Broadcast Meteorology is announcing an update to the on-air portion of the CBM application. If you or a colleague is considering applying for the CBM, these changes will apply. Please note, this is only a change to the video submission requirements; there are no changes to the educational requirements for the CBM program, or will there be any changes to the closed-book testing process.
Read More

 

3/13/2013

New and backlist AMS books and monographs to be available via Springer.com and SpringerLink
The American Meteorological Society (AMS) is partnering with Springer to enable the electronic distribution of dozens of AMS’s books and monographs, including out-of-print legacy titles that will be made available through print-on-demand (POD) as well.
Read More

 

10/11/2012

American Meteorological Society and Second Nature Announce 2nd Annual AMS Climate Studies Course Implementation Workshop for MSI Faculty
As part of its Climate Studies Diversity Project, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) has partnered with Second Nature, lead supporting organization of the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC), to introduce the AMS Climate Studies course at 100 minority-serving institutions (MSIs) over a five-year period.
PDF Version

 

07/21/2009

PROPOSALS TO GEOENGINEER CLIMATE REQUIRE MORE RESEARCH, CAUTIOUS CONSIDERATION, AND APPROPRIATE RESTRICTIONSGeoengineering - deliberately manipulating physical, chemical, or biological aspects of the Earth system to confront climate change – could contribute to a comprehensive risk management strategy to slow climate change but could also create considerable new risks, according to a policy statement released by the American Meteorological Society (AMS) today.
PDF Version

 

06/23/2009

300 Billion Weather Forecasts Used by Americans Annually, Survey Finds
BOULDER—Close to 9 out of 10 adult Americans obtain weather forecasts regularly, and they do so more than three times each day on average, a new nationwide survey by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has found.
PDF Version

 

05/12/2009

Any way you slice it, warming climate is affecting Cascades snowpack
There has been sharp disagreement in recent years about how much, or even whether, winter snowpack has declined in the Cascade Mountains of Washington and Oregon during the last half-century.
PDF Version

 

04/21/2009

Water Levels Dropping in Some Major Rivers as Global Climate Changes

Rivers in some of the world’s most populous regions are losing water, according to a new comprehensive study of global stream flow. The study, led by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), suggests that in many cases the reduced flows are associated with climate change. The process could potentially threaten future supplies of food and water.   UCAR News Center  Abstract  For Paper Contact Stephanie Kenitzer

PDF Version

 

12/22/2008

Study shows Northwest European windstorm patterns unaffected by global warming
An international team of researchers, led by Dr Edward Hanna from the University of Sheffield’s Department of Geography, has discovered that the intensity of windstorms around the British Isles has not increased due to global warming.
PDF Version

 

11/06/2008

NIU researchers say nighttime tornadoes are worst nightmare
Twisters that occur from midnight to dawn are 2.5 times more likely to kill DeKalb, IL – A new study by Northern Illinois University scientists underscores the danger of nighttime tornadoes and suggests that warning systems that have led to overall declines in tornado death rates might not be adequate for overnight events, which occur most frequently in the nation’s mid-South region. 
PDF Version

 

7/30/2008

TIMING IS EVERYTHING: HOW VULNERABLE TO FLOODING IS NEW YORK CITY?
A report just released in the most recent issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society offers hope that a new high-resolution storm surge modeling system developed by scientists at Stony Brook University will better be able to predict flood levels and when flooding will occur in the New York metropolitan area, information crucial to emergency managers when planning for impending storms.
PDF Version

 

7/24/2008

Fully Updated Climate Change Book by Scripps Researcher Now Available from AMS
A comprehensive and up-to-date account of climate change science by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego climate scientist Richard Somerville is now available from the American Meteorological Society.  
PDF Version

 

4/16/2008

Media Advisory: Press Briefing and National Teleconference Weather Modification: The State of the Science
Commercial operators, governments, and academic researchers worldwide are engaging in cloud seeding and other weather modification projects to try to influence local conditions. But how effective are these programs?
PDF Version

 

1/15/2008

Record warm summers cause extreme ice melt in Greenland
An international team of scientists, led by Dr Edward Hanna at the University of Sheffield, has demonstrated that recent warm summers have caused the most extreme Greenland ice melting in 50 years. The new research provides further evidence of a key impact of global warming and helps scientists place recent satellite observations of Greenland´s shrinking ice mass in a longer-term climatic context.
Press Release | Findings in Journal of Climate

     
 

11/20/2007

The Power of Multiples:  Connecting Wind Farms Can Make A More Reliable – and Cheaper – Power Source
Wind power, long considered to be as fickle as wind itself, can be groomed to become a steady, dependable source of electricity and delivered at a lower cost than at present, according to scientists at Stanford University.
PDF Version

 

08/28/2007

SCIENTISTS SEE FIRST SIGNS OF LONG-TERM CHANGES IN TROPICAL RAINFALL
WASHINGTON - NASA scientists have detected the first signs that tropical rainfall is on the rise, using the longest and most complete data record available.
PDF Version

 

08/20/2007

Scientists Verify Predictive Model for Winter Weather
Scientists have verified the accuracy of a model that uses October snow cover in Siberia to predict upcoming winter temperatures and snowfall for the high- and mid-latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere.
http://www.nsf.gov/news/
news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=109820&org=NSF&from=news

 

06/06/2007

AMS Statement on Hurricane Forecasting:  Hurricane Track Forecasts Improved Tremendously in Past 5 Years; Intensity Forecasts, Other Challenges Remain
Hurricane track forecasts, the forecasts that pinpoint the path of a storm, have improved steadily in recent decades with track forecast errors now roughly half of what they were in 1990, but predicting the intensity of the storms is still a challenge for forecasters, according to a new information statement on hurricane forecasting issued by the American Meteorological Society. 
PDF Version

 

05/14/07

NASA'S CLOSEUP LOOK AT A HURRICANE'S EYE REVEALS A NEW "FUEL" SOURCE
In the eye of a furious hurricane, the weather is often quite calm and sunny. But new NASA research is providing clues about how the seemingly subtle movement of air within and around this region provides energy to keep this central "powerhouse" functioning.
PDF Version

 

05/14/07

NASA Study Suggests Extreme Summer Warming in the Future
A new study by NASA scientists suggests that greenhouse gas warming may raise average summer temperatures in the eastern United States nearly 10 degrees Fahrenheit by the 2080s.
PDF Version

 

04/23/07

CU-BOULDER STUDY TRACES DELAY IN NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON TO PACIFIC OCEAN WARMING
The southwestern United States has experienced a significant delay in its annual summer monsoon rains in recent decades due to warmer sea-surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean, according to a new study at the University of Colorado at Boulder.
PDF Version

 

04/02/2007

REPORT FINDS BETTER COORDINATION IS NEEDED TO DEAL WITH SPACE WEATHER IMPACTS ON AVIATION SAFETY AND EFFICIENCY
Better forecasts of space weather events and better use of those forecasts by the aviation industry could lead to safer operations and hundreds of thousands of dollars in savings for airlines, according to a new report by the American Meteorological Society and SolarMetrics.  The report, “Integrating Space Weather Observations & Forecasts into Aviation Operations,” is the outcome of a two-day workshop last fall among aviation and space weather experts. 
PDF Version HTML Version

 

03/01/2007

Taking Climate Change Discussions Beyond the Science - AMS Launches New Climate Policy Blog: http://www.climatepolicy.org/
The American Meteorological Society, the nation's leading professional soci­ety for those in the atmospheric and related sciences, launched a new weblog (“blog”) today to address the challenging policy issues related to climate change.  The goal is to help decision makers at all levels make sound policy based on the best available information.
PDF Version

 

02/02/2007

New AMS Statement on Climate Change:  Climate is Changing; Humans Play a Role
Despite uncertainties, there is adequate evidence from observations and interpretations of climate simulations to conclude that the atmosphere, ocean, and land surface are warming; that humans have significantly contributed to this change; and that further climate change will continue to have important impacts on human societies, on economies, on ecosystems and on wildlife through the 21st century and beyond, according to a new information statement on climate change issued by the American Meteorological Society today.
PDF Version

 

01/07

AMS Awards (pdfs)

Stommel Award: John A. Whitehead
Jule G. Charney Award: Dr. Alan K. Betts
Carl Gustaf Rossby Research Medal: Kerry A. Emanuel
Clarence Leroy Meisinger Award: Amy C. Clement
Charles Franklin Brooks Award: Warren M. Washington

 

12/05/2006

Southern Ocean Could Slow Global Warming - Research Appears in 15 December AMS Journal of Climate
The Southern Ocean may slow the rate of global warming by absorbing significantly more heat and carbon dioxide than previously thought, according to new research published in the 15 December issue of the AMS Journal of Climate.
PDF Version

 

12/04/2006

ResearchChannel Awards AMS Matching Funds for Video Production

ResearchChannel awarded matching funds to five institutions including the AMS today as part of its first-ever Matching Funds Production Awards Program which encourages the creation of productions that further public awareness of research addressing important and wide-ranging issues.
PDF Version

 

10/26/2006

NASA Satellite Finds the World's Most Intense Thunderstorms
A summer thunderstorm often provides much-needed rainfall and heat wave relief, but others bring large hail, destructive winds, and tornadoes. Now with the help of NASA satellite data, scientists are gaining insight into the distribution of such storms around much of the world.
PDF Version

 

09/22/2006

AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY – SEPTEMBER SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS
Following are story ideas and tips about upcoming AMS meetings, papers in our nine peer-reviewed journals, and other happenings in the atmospheric and related sciences community. 
PDF Version

 

09/21/2006

New Research Detects Human-induced Climate Change at a Regional Scale in Canada, Southern Europe and China
Canadian and British climate scientists have clearly detected human-induced climate change at a regional scale in Canada, southern Europe and China. 
PDF Version

 

08/11/2006

AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY – AUGUST SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS
Following are story ideas and tips about upcoming AMS meetings, papers in our nine peer-reviewed journals, and other happenings in the atmospheric and related sciences community. 
PDF Version

 

07/06/2006

AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY – JULY SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS
Following are story ideas and tips about upcoming AMS meetings, papers in our nine peer-reviewed journals, and other happenings in the atmospheric and related sciences community. 
PDF Version

 

05/18/2006

NOAA SCIENTISTS RE-ANALYZE WEATHER CONDITIONS DURING WRECK OF THE EDMUND FITZGERALD
May 18, 2006 — A re-analysis of the weather conditions on Lake Superior during the November 1975 gale when the lake freighter Edmund Fitzgerald went down, killing all 29 aboard, shows a period when the winds and waves were the most extreme, say the NOAA scientists who conducted the review.
http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2006/s2633.htm

 

05/12/2006

Pollution, Greenhouse Gases and Climate Clash in South Asia, Scripps Study Shows
Pollution clouds in region appear to 'mask' aspects of South Asian climate, leading to drought and other impacts
Word Version PDF Version

 

05/02/2006

AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY – MAY SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS
Following are story ideas and tips about upcoming AMS meetings, papers in our nine peer-reviewed journals, and other happenings in the atmospheric and related sciences community. 
PDF Version

 

03/22/2006

AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY – MARCH SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS
Following are story ideas and tips about upcoming AMS meetings, papers in our nine peer-reviewed journals, and other happenings in the atmospheric and related sciences community. 
PDF Version

 

03/21/2006

NATURAL HAZARDS ARE MORE COMMON THAN STATISTICS INDICATE
Does it seem like the 100-year severe weather events are happening more often than every 100 years?  That’s because they do, according to an analysis published in the American Meteorological Society’s February issue of the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology.
Word Version PDF Version

 

03/20/2006

Scientists Use Satellites to Detect Deep-Ocean Whirlpools
Move over, Superman, with your X-ray vision. Marine scientists have now figured out a way to "see through" the ocean's surface and detect what's below, with the help of satellites in space.
Word Version PDF Version

more information: http://www.udel.edu/PR/UDaily/2006/mar/whirlpools032006.html

 

2/16/2006

AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY TIP SHEET
Following are story ideas and tips about upcoming AMS meetings, papers in our nine peer-reviewed journals, and other happenings in the atmospheric and related sciences community.
PDF Version

 

01/12/2006

MEDIA ADVISORY: AMS ANNUAL MEETING STARTS JANUARY 28 IN ATLANTA
The American Meteorological Society’s 86th Annual Meeting will be held January 28- February 3, 2006, at the WorldCongressCenter in Atlanta.  More than 2,000 of the world’s leading atmospheric scientists will gather to discuss a broad range of weather and climate-related issues including space weather, drought, flash floods, 2005 weather highlights, climate change, aviation weather, wildfires, meteorological history, heat and health issues, and much more.
PDF Version

 

 

11/15/2005

AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY SEPTEMBER SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS
This monthly tip sheet is designed to give you story ideas and tips about upcoming AMS meetings, papers in our nine peer-reviewed journals, and other happenings in the atmospheric and related sciences community.
PDF Version

10/17/2005

A WARMER WORLD MIGHT NOT BE A WETTER ONE
A NASA study is offering new insight into how the Earth's water cycle might be influenced by global change. In recent years, scientists have warned that the water cycle may be affected by temperature changes, as warmer temperatures can increase the moistureholding capacity of air.
PDF Version

09/26/2005

AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY SEPTEMBER SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS
This monthly tip sheet is designed to give you story ideas and tips about upcoming AMS meetings, papers in our nine peer-reviewed journals, and other happenings in the atmospheric and related sciences community.
PDF Version

07/21/2005

AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY JULY SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS
This monthly tip sheet is designed to give you story ideas and tips about upcoming AMS meetings, papers in our nine peer-reviewed journals, and other happenings in the atmospheric and related sciences community.
PDF Version

06/15/2005

AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY JUNE SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS
This monthly tip sheet is designed to give you story ideas and tips about upcoming AMS meetings, papers in our nine peer-reviewed journals, and other happenings in the atmospheric and related sciences community.
PDF Version

06/08/2005

RESEARCHERS DEMONSTRATE NEXRAD RADAR
HELPS NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORECASTERS SAVE LIVES
Tornado warnings have improved significantly and the number of tornado casualties has decreased by nearly half since a network of Doppler weather radars were installed nationwide by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Weather Service a decade ago, according to a study published in the June issue of Weather and Forecasting, a journal of the American Meteorological Society.
PDF Version

05/17/2005

AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY MAY SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS
This monthly tip sheet is designed to give you story ideas and tips about upcoming AMS meetings, papers in our nine peer-reviewed journals, and other happenings in the atmospheric and related sciences community.
PDF Version

 

 


12/01/2004

LONG AWAITED NORTHEAST SNOWSTORMS BOOK NOW AVAILABLE
The long-awaited Northeast Snowstorms, an in-depth look at some of the nation’s most powerful winter storms by two of the leading experts in this field, is now available from the American Meteorological Society.Word Version  PDF Version

   

11/29/2004

Stratosphere temperature data support scientists’ proof for global warming
A new interpretation for temperature data from satellites, published earlier this year, raised controversy when its authors claimed it eliminated doubt that, on average, the lower atmosphere is getting warmer as fast as the Earth’s surface. Word Version  PDF Version

   

10/20/2004

Better Analyses of Wind, Damage Models Would Help Insurers Anticipate Hurricane Costs, UCF Professor, Georgia Colleague Say— ORLANDO, Oct. 19, 2004 – Insurance companies could better anticipate their annual costs in hurricane claims if they used more accurate models of storm winds and the severity of damage they will likely cause, a University of Central Florida professor and his Georgia colleague concluded. News Release:  Word Version  PDF Version

   

09/23/2004

KEITH L. SEITTER NAMED EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY— Dr. Keith L. Seitter has been named Executive Director of the American Meteorological Society (AMS), the nation’s leading professional society for those involved in the atmospheric and related sciences.
News Release:  Word Version  PDF Version

09/14/2004

LEWIS AND CLARK: PIONEERS IN METEOROLOGY, TOO— Add meteorology to the list of pioneering achievements associated with the 1804-1806 expedition of Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. The finding is uncovered by Susan Solomon and John Daniel of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Aeronomy Laboratory in Boulder, Colo., in a paper published in the September issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. NOAA is an agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce. News Release:  Word Version  PDF Version

09/13/2004

Lewis and Clark slip through climatic window to the West — ATLANTA -- They hadn’t planned it, but Meriwether Lewis and William Clark picked a fine time for a road trip when they set out to find a water route across the American Northwest two centuries ago.. News Release:  Word Version  PDF Version

   

09/10/2004

‘Reach for the Sky and Collect Stamps!’ with Cloudscapes during national stamp collecting month— WASHINGTON – The world’s most popular hobby will rise to greater heights when the U.S. Postal Service issues the 37-cent Cloudscapes commemorative postage stamps, postal cards and philatelic collectables on Oct. 4, during the launch of National Stamp Collecting Month. This year’s theme, “Reach for the Sky and Collect Stamps!” includes an alliance with The Weather Channel, the American Meteorological Society and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Weather Service to educate stamp collectors about atmospheric sciences. News Release:  Word Version  PDF Version

   

08/12/2004

Forest burning is a net contributor to global warming, scientist says—What is the net effect on global temperature of the gases and particles produced when biomass is burned? That long-standing question in climate change has finally been answered, according to Mark Z. Jacobson, a Stanford associate professor of civil and environmental engineering. In a study published in the Aug. 1 issue of the American Meteorological Society's Journal of Climate, he concludes that the particles cause short-term global cooling, but over decades the gases overwhelm this cooling effect to cause long-term global warming. News Release:  Word Version  PDF Version

   

07/26/2004

Is Less Snow in New England’s Forecast?— With mid summer upon us, most New Englanders long ago packed away thoughts of snow and winter sports in favor of fair-weather pursuits. Lawn mowers, canoes, and short sleeves have displaced shovels, sleds, and heavy coats. And new research suggests that the tools and toys of winter are staying in the back of the closet and storage shed a bit longer throughout the region than they once did. According to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study published in the July issue of the American Meteorological Society’s Journal of Climate, the yearly snow decreased significantly in favor of rain during the last half of the 20th century. News Release:  Word Version  PDF Version

   

06/08/2004

NASA DATA SHOWS DEFORESTATION AFFECTS CLIMATE IN THE AMAZON— NASA satellite data are giving scientists insight into how large-scale deforestation in the Amazon Basin in South America is affecting regional climate. Researchers found during the Amazon dry season last August, there was a distinct pattern of higher rainfall and warmer temperatures over deforested regions.   News Release:  Word Version  PDF Version

   

05/26/2004

EPA and NOAA’s National Weather Service Adopt New Global Ultraviolet - Index Guidelines Guidance helps reduce overexposure to dangerous UV rays—Washington, DC, May 26, 2004 – The EPA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) National Weather Service today announced the new Global Ultraviolet (UV) Index, which replaces the existing UV reporting methods in the United States.   News Release:  Word Version  PDF Version

 

04/20/2004

NATIONAL ROAD WEATHER RESEARCH PROGRAM WOULD MAKE HIGHWAYS SAFER, MORE EFFICIENT—With countless lives and millions of dollars at stake each day, the nation’s highway system could benefit significantly from a federally-funded national road weather research program that was coordinated among various public, private and academic communities that have a stake in it. That was the major finding from a two-day policy forum hosted on November 4—5, 2003 by the American Meteorological Society (AMS).  Press Release:  Word Version  PDF Version

 

04/12/2004

NOAA RESEARCHER SAYS SAHARAN AIR LAYER CONNECTED TO ATLANTIC HURRICANE SUPPRESSION AND INTENSITY CHANGE—A National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) researcher is using NOAA satellite technology to take a closer look at the effect African air may have on hurricanes, especially how they develop and change intensity.   Work as published in the March issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society  Press Release:  Word Version  PDF Version

 

03/15/2004

AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY TO HOST NATIONAL LIVE WEBCAST ON PROPOSED PARTNERSHIP POLICY —The American Meteorological Society will host a national live Webcast on Wednesday, 14 April 2004, to discuss the National Weather Service’s proposed policy on partnerships in the provision on weather, water, climate and related environmental information.

The live Webcast will take place on 14 April 2004 from 1—4 p.m. Eastern Time. Participation is open to all parties in the atmospheric science community that wish to comment on the NWS proposed policy. There is no charge for the Webcast, however, participants are encouraged to register in advance to receive background materials and further updates on the Webcast. Registration is available on the AMS Web site at www.ametsoc.org   Press Release:  Word Version  PDF Version

 

03/09/2004

NEW SCALE MEASURES IMPACT OF NORTHEAST SNOW STORMS— Since the 1970s, meteorologists have ranked the destruction potential of hurricanes and tornadoes on a scale of or 1 to 5. Now scientists have developed a scale that measures the disruption potential of Northeast snowstorms.

The Northeast Snowfall Impact Scale (NESIS) is a new 1-to-5 ranking for snowstorms striking the region from southern Virginia to New England, developed by Paul Kocin, winter weather expert at The Weather Channel, and Louis Uccellini, director of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, part of the National Weather Service. Their research appears in the February issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.   Newsrelease:  Word Version  PDF Version

 

01/09/04

NOAA EXPERTS SHARE SCIENCE AND POLICIES AT NATIONAL METEOROLOGICAL MEETING IN SEATTLE—   NOAA leaders will discuss organizational policies and researchers will share their latest findings on a variety of climate and weather-related topics during the American Meteorological Society (AMS) 84th Annual Meeting, Sunday through Thursday, Jan. 11-15. All activities take place at the Washington State Convention & Trade Center in Seattle.  Newsrelease:  Word Version  PDF Version



11/03/2003

WATER VAPOR FROM VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS COULD IMPACT CLIMATE CHANGE—  A computer model shows that large volcanic eruptions, which can affect global weather patterns by adding tiny particles or droplets of liquid called aerosols to the atmosphere, also add water vapor to the stratosphere, the region between 10-50 kilometers above the Earth’s surface. Stratospheric water vapor is potentially an important factor in climate change.  Newsrelease:  Word Version  PDF Version; Article in Journal of Climate, Vol. 16, No. 21, pp. 3525—3534

09/22/2003

FINANCIAL LOSSES OF WEATHER EXTREMES ARE HARD TO MEASURE—   How much financial loss do weather extremes such as Hurricane Isabel cause is often the million dollar question. Insurance companies, businesses, government agencies and scientists all want to know how much damage a particular tornado or hurricane caused. The answer, however, is partly cloudy.   Newsrelease:  Word Version  PDF Version; Article in Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, Vol. 84, No. 9, pp. 1231–1235

09/04/2003

HOW PREDICTABLE IS EL NINO? SCIENCE DOES HAVE LIMITATIONS —  Why are different El Nino episodes so different and so difficult to predict? The answer may involve atmospheric noise -- bursts of wind and other transient atmospheric events that are nearly impossible to predict but have an important effect on the overall intensity and perhaps the length of El Nino events.  Newsrelease:  Word Version  PDF Version; Article> in Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, Vol. 84, No. 7, pp. 911–919

09/03/2003

OCEAN MAY SPONGE UP SOME WARMTH OVER NEXT 50 YEARS —  NASA's improved global climate computer model, which simulates and projects how the Earth's climate may change, indicates that the oceans have been absorbing heat since 1951 and will continue to absorb more heat from the atmosphere over the next 50 years. This increasing ocean heat storage suggests that global surface temperatures may warm less than previous studies projected, while the ocean acts as a bigger heat sponge. Further, such additional ocean heating would likely change regional climate patterns.   Newsrelease:  Word Version  PDF Version; Article in Journal of Climate, Vol. 16 2807–2826

08/20/2003

EL NIÑO'S SURPRISING STEADY PACIFIC RAINS CAN AFFECT WORLD WEATHER — Scientists using data from a NASA satellite have found another piece in the global climate puzzle created by El Niño. El Niño events produce more of a steady rain in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. This is important because whenever there is a change in the amount and duration of rainfall over an area, such as the central Pacific, it affects weather regionally and even worldwide.   Newsrelease:  Word Version  PDF Version

08/7/2003

NASA OZONE SATELLITE IMPROVES SNOWSTORM FORECASTS —  Scientists in sunny, hot Florida are thinking cold thoughts since they added ozone measurements from a NASA satellite into computer weather forecast models and improved several factors in a forecast of a major winter snowstorm that hit the United States in 2000.   Newsrelease:  Word Version  PDF Version

06/09/2003

New Study by Scripps Researchers Shows Western Wildfires Are Linked to Variations in Climate — Scientists from the California Applications Program at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, have found a link between variations in climate and the severity of wildfires that spans a range of regions and ecosystems across the Western U.S. over the last two decades.

In developing the first comprehensive database of Western wildfires, the researchers found that, for particular vegetation types across the West, the acres burned tend to result from a few characteristic patterns in moisture surplus or deficit that develop over a few to several seasons. The type of vegetation is key because it determines the growth of wildfire fuel and how it stores moisture.

"The database provides evidence for a direct link between climate, vegetation, and wildfire severity," said Anthony Westerling, a Scripps researcher and lead author of the study appearing in the May issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.   Newsrelease:  Word Version  PDF Version

05/27/2003

Coastal Cities Turn up the Heat on Rainfall — WASHINGTON - Houston, Texas, makes some of its own rain, and it is probably not alone among large coastal cities, according to a new study. Researchers at NASA and the University of Arkansas anticipate that the impact of "urban heat islands" on weather patterns will become greater in the 21st century.  AMS/AGU/NASA-GSFC/U. Of Arkansas Joint Newsrelease

"Detection of Urban-Induced Rainfall Anomalies in a Major Coastal City" by J.Marshall Shepherd and Steven J. Burian.  Report appears in the journal Earth Interactions published jointly by the AGU/AMS/AAG

04/24/2003

HURRICANE WINDS CARRIED OCEAN SALT & PLANKTON FAR INLAND —Researchers found surprising evidence of sea salt and frozen plankton in high, cold, cirrus clouds, the remnants of Hurricane Nora, over the U.S. plains states. Although the 1997 hurricane was a strong eastern Pacific storm, her high ice-crystal clouds extended many miles inland, carrying ocean phenomena deep into the U.S. heartland.  Word Version  PDF Version    Link to abstract, found in Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, Vol. 60, No. 7, 873—891

03/05/2003

NASA-Funded Research Looking at El Niño Events to Forecast Western U.S. Snowfall — A NASA-funded study uses a computer model to understand an observed link between winter and spring snowfall in the Western U.S. and El Niño Southern Oscillation. [These findings were presented at the 83rd Annual Meeting of the American Meteorological Society in Long Beach, Calif.]  Word Version  PDF Version

03/04/2003

Changes in the Earth's Rotation are in the Wind — Because of Earth's dynamic climate, winds and atmospheric pressure systems experience constant change. These fluctuations may affect how our planet rotates on its axis, according to NASA-funded research that used wind and satellite data.   Word Version  PDF Version

01/15/2003

NASA Scientists take first "Full-Body Scan of evolving thunderstorm — A doctor gets a better view inside a patient by probing the body with CAT and MRI scanning equipment. Now, NASA meteorologists have done a kind of "full-body scan" of an evolving thunderstorm in the tropics, using advanced radar equipment to provide a remarkable picture of the storm's anatomy. The observations are expected to help double-check satellite rainfall measurements, improve computer models of storms, and make the skies safer for airplanes to navigate.   Word Version  PDF Version

2002

12/16/2002

Cars May Be Less Dangerous Than Mobile Homes and the Outdoors During Tornadoes, According to Study by Kent State University Researchers— The meteorological and emergency management communities have long recommended that people should get out of mobile homes and cars and seek shelter in a building or in a ditch if a tornado is bearing down on them. New findings from researchers at Kent State University suggests that cars may be a less dangerous option than the outdoors, especially relative to mobile homes.  Word Version  PDF Version

12/10/2002

Springtime Temperature Swings Attack Northeastern Forests Seasonal Weather Related to Large-Scale Climate Pattern— BOULDER-Forest dieback in the northeastern United States and neighboring areas in Canada has been more frequent, more persistent, and more severe during recent decades, research has shown. Now scientists have found springtime temperature swings have intensified in that region during the same period. A new study links these escalating freeze-thaw episodes, which are known to harm trees, to an atmospheric pressure imbalance over the North Atlantic. The research, by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the University of Washington, is published in the December 15 issue of the Journal of Climate, a publication of the American Meteorological Society (AMS).  Word Version  PDF Version

11/7/2002

New Method Strikes an Improvement in Lightning Predictions — A new lightning index that uses measurements of water vapor in the atmosphere from Global Positioning Systems has improved lead-time for predicting the first lightning strikes from thunderstorms.  Word Version  PDF Version

11/6/2002

Ocean Temperatures, Affect Intensity of the South Asian Monsoon and Rainfalll — Warmer or colder sea surface temperatures (SST) may affect one of the world's key large-scale atmospheric circulations that regulate the intensity and breaking of rainfall associated with the South Asian and Australian monsoons, according to new research from NASA.  Word Version  PDF Version

11/4/2002

Transition From El Niño to La Niña Affected Vegetation — NASA scientists using satellite data have shown that shifts in rainfall patterns from one of the strongest El Niño events of the century in 1997 to a La Niña event in 2000 significantly changed vegetation patterns over.  Word Version  PDF Version

8/14/2002

New Breed of Heat Wave — DeKalb, Ill.- A study by Northern Illinois University climatologist David Changnon indicates the Chicago region is more apt now than in decades past to experience heat waves accompanied by extreme and dangerous spikes in humidity. And a familiar crop with a propensity to sweat day and night could be at the root of the problem. Newsrelease    Paper in August issue of Journal of Applied Meteorology

6/25/2002

SUMMER THUNDERSTORMS MAY BECOME MORE PREDICTABLE. — BOULDER-Meteorologists have long known that summer thunderstorms and heavy rains are difficult to predict. They pop up quickly and disappear within a few short hours. Newsrelease Word Version   PDF Version   The paper appears in the July 1 2002 issue of the American Meteorological Society's Journal of Atmospheric Science

6/18/2002

NASA SATELLITE CONFIRMS URBAN HEAT ISLANDS INCREASE RAINFALL AROUND CITIES. — NASA researchers have for the first time used a rainfall-measuring satellite to confirm that "urban heat-islands" create more summer rain over and downwind of major cities, including Atlanta, Dallas, San Antonio, and Nashville. Newsrelease   The study appears in the July 2002 issue of the American Meteorological Society's Journal of Applied Meteorology

5/02/2002

THUNDERSTORMS ARE AFFECTED BY POLLUTION. — A NASA-funded researcher has discovered that tiny airborne particles of pollution may modify developing thunderclouds by increasing the quantity and reducing the size of ice crystals within them. These modifications may affect the cloud's impact on the "radiation budget," the amount of radiation that enters and leaves the Earth.  Word Version  PDF Version

4/30/2002

NASA LOOKS A HURRICANE'S TEMPERATURE IN THE EYE — Last year, NASA researchers took the temperature of the eye of Hurricane Erin to determine how a hurricane's warm center fuels the strength of storms.   Word Version  PDF Version

3/05/2002

NASA STUDY LINKS EL NIÑO AND SOUTHERN OCEAN CHANGES — NASA researchers have found strong relationships between El Niño episodes and changes in climate and sea ice cover around Antarctica.   Word Version  PDF Version

2/21/2002

Can We Influence Global Weather -- Some Scientists Say Theoretically Yes, Practically, Not Yet   Word Version  PDF Version

2/08/2002

WEATHER CAN MEAN THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SILVER AND GOLD   Word Version  PDF Version

1/07/2002

UMAINE PROFESSOR DEVELOPS CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM FOR EASTERN AND CENTRAL U.S. WINTER STORMS   Word Version  PDF Version


 

AMS Logo
 Headquarters: 45 Beacon Street Boston, MA 02108-3693
  DC Office: 1200 New York Ave NW, Suites 450 & 500, Washington, DC 20005-3928
 amsinfo@ametsoc.org Phone: 617-227-2425 Fax: 617-742-8718
© 2013 American Meteorological Society Privacy Policy and Disclaimer